Thursday, April 22, 2010

Struggling with, Then Surrendering to, Sin

Contemporary Christian singer Jennifer Knapp recently announced her lesbian orientation. In the news piece I read, a few lines struck me.

The article says that Knapp “has always struggled as a person of faith to be the person she wants to be.” Perhaps this is obvious to the readers of this blog, but let me just state what is obvious to me. People of faith are to become (and struggle, if necessary, to become) the people God wants them to be. We all struggle with sinful inclinations of what we would be. But what our sinful nature wants is diametrically opposed to what God wants. People of faith should not surrender to the sinful side.

“God has always known she would walk this path, Knapp said.” That is absolutely true, but it’s not a justification for that path. God knew the paths Hitler and Mao and Stalin would walk, too, but they’re not off the hook just because he knew about it. Knapp is probably implying a kind of fatalism, that she couldn’t help but be lesbian, but the Bible doesn’t teach fatalism; it teaches human responsibility.

Finally, Knapp is quoted as saying, “If I am in any way unpleasing in his sight, I can only hope and pray that he gives me the opportunity to find who I am supposed to be.” He has, Jennifer, at least with regards to your sexuality, and he will continue to do so as long as he maintains your life on this earth. The clear guidance he has given you is the combined witness of Scripture and the gender he has given you. He wants you to be a heterosexual woman.

It is a sad thing when a professed believer struggles with homosexual inclinations, eventually surrenders to them, and then skews Scripture and theology in order to demonstrate the morality of his or her lifestyle. The struggle within these individuals is very real, and I think it brings to them a great deal of misery. “Please make me heterosexual” may be a regular cry of many of them.

Scriptural teaching is clear on this matter, and the tension between the strength of Scripture on the one hand, and the strength of their desires and the pull of the world on the other hand, brings nothing but weariness, exhaustion, and inner turmoil.

Peace and joy comes with either conforming one’s lifestyle to Scripture or conforming one’s interpretation of Scripture with his lifestyle. But the peace and joy of the former is of a higher quality and far more enduring nature than the peace and joy of the latter. And with such a decision one’s eternity is on the line.

May this issue in Knapp’s life not be resolved yet until it’s resolved right.

1 comment:

j.scantlin said...

"Peace and joy comes with either conforming one’s lifestyle to Scripture or conforming one’s interpretation of Scripture with his lifestyle. But the peace and joy of the former is of a higher quality and far more enduring nature than the peace and joy of the latter. And with such a decision one’s eternity is on the line."

Yes! Excellent. Thank you.