Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Good Advice for Slow Readers

Like to read?
Wish you could read faster while retaining comprehension?
Wish you could get through more books than what you do?

Me, too.

Here's some advice on how to get through more books as a slow reader.

2 comments:

j.scantlin said...

I read this whole post because it was short and it had a picture of a turtle.

Anonymous said...

Dear Kent,
The article you suggested here is good.
THIS ALSO MIGHT HELP FOR YOUR BLOGGER? (Only if you want to. There are other ways to do this, I'm sure.)
SPEED READING: Reportedly, President JFK was a great speed reader. He supposedly read several news papers every day. He would pick up a paper, open it up, read one side and then the other. Then he would turn to the next two pages and do this again at an amazing pace, comprehending the material as well.
SUGGESTIONS I HAVE HEARD THAT SOME SPEED-READING TEACHERS ADVISE:
1. If you are reading every single word on every single line, you are way, too slow.
2. Think of a sentence as a picture.
3. Look at the MIDDLE of the sentence picture.
4. Catch the key words, usually the lengthier ones (but not always).
5. Quickly move your eyes to the middle of the next "picture" (sentence).
PRACTICE THIS.
6. If you are reading every little sentence, you are way too slow.
7. Think of each paragraph as a picture.
8. Hold the document center-position of your eyes.
9. Quickly comprehend the intro, meat, and conclusion as a finished painting, having caught significant colors, shapes and sizes of depicted thought.
10. Quickly move your eyes to the middle of the next "picture" (paragraph).
PRACTICE THIS.
11. If you belabor every small paragraph, you are reading way too slow.
12. Think of each page as a complete picture.
13. Hold the page center-position of your eyes.
14. Quickly comprehend the intro, meat, and conclusion as a finished painting, having caught significant colors, shapes and sizes of depicted thought.
15. Quickly move your eyes to the middle of the next "picture" (page).
PRACTICE THIS. --Dad
P.S.
I have used this method a little, and the more I know the Bible --the book from which I have read the most, Kent-- Quite well I know this works at this stage of the "game" for me. The late Dr. W. Forest Weddle recommended I, occasionally, review the notes I have made in my own books I've already read (other than the Bible -- but this works there too); and such a practice helps to find it unnecessary to re-read the entire book when you are in a hurry.
It is said that a USED TEXTBOOK is more valuable than a new one because of the significant notes someone has already put in it.